Static: Wednesday, July 18, 2002
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
As the C.D. Turns

Another head was lopped at 96.3 KSCS, where the radio station’s behind-the-scenes shenanigans feature more backstabbing and heartache than their corporate-mandated playlist of crying-in-your-beer tunes. Program director Dean James, infamous head-lopper, met his own Waterloo on July 12. Former station director Ted Stecker, who guided the station during its early 1990s glory days, may be called upon to help return the station to its former prominent status, which crumbled after 99.5 The Wolf hit the airwaves in 1998 and began chomping serious chunks out of KSCS bohiney.

James took over in 1993, saw KSCS’ ratings tumble over the years, and engineered several unpopular decisions, such as pushing jockey Nadine off the air in 2001. “He made a lot of mistakes,” said an insider who requested anonymity. “He didn’t have any rhyme or reason on some of the things he was doing.” KSCS’ shortcomings include promotion and direction. The younger, hipper Wolf smacks of cutting-edge Robert Earl Keen, happening street parties, independent artists, and trendy jock Justin Frazzell. KSCS is Nashville-slick Alan Jackson, stale prizes, and the cheesy Dorsey Gang. Enough said.

Watch Where You Annex

City leaders might learn that stepping boldly in rural areas can cause snakebite. Residents against involuntary annexations are promising to make Mayor Kenneth Barr and his six dwarves pay with their political futures. Of eight city council members, only two — Chuck Silcox and Clyde Picht — stand against involuntary annexation. City elections are 10 months away, and fiery vows to boot people out of office tend to cool in time. But these rural folks sound serious. After the council voted to annex the west zones, Barr told dissenters to get financially prepared. “He never once said, ‘Welcome to Fort Worth, we’ll do whatever we can to help you,’ ” said county resident Randy McCarty. “It was, basically, get your pocketbook ready to pay. It was humiliating. That’s the worst experience I ever had in my life.”

The city’s initial annexation plan affected 10,000 people like McCarty. If 25 percent voted, that’s 2,500 votes — enough to affect elections. Now, try this current rumor: Maybe Mayor Barr, whose businesses were delinquent on $89,000 in property taxes this year, wants to refocus on those responsibilities. He takes the brunt of the criticism for annexation and steps down as mayor. Retiring State Sen. Mike Moncrief runs to replace him. So Barr would be gone, other council members would be safe and the same pro-growth establishment would remain in charge.

Weekly Woes

Static regrets to report that longtime staffer Betty Brink has filed an EEOC complaint against Fort Worth Weekly alleging sex and age discrimination based on her pay scale. Weekly editor Gayle Reaves said that the paper has treated Brink, a prize-winning reporter, fairly and legally on all counts.

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