Static: Thursday, September 19, 2002
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
Falling Saucer

Falling Saucer

Wednesday is commemorative beer glass night at the Flying Saucer — you pay $7 or so and get a beer plus a glass that advertises a particular beer, beer company or, 10 times a year, things like John Lennon’s birthday or tax day. This year, Sept. 11 fell on a Wednesday — so —hey, a World Trade Center beer glass! “It just seemed like a no-brainer,” said Shannon Wynne, president of 8.0 management, which owns and operates the Flying Saucer, 8.0, and Flying Fish establishments in North Texas.

Static would have to agree with the no-brain part. How could an anniversary beer glass possibly honor the thousands of people who died on Sept. 11, 2001? (Oh, and on the back, it says, “We won’t forget you either, Bin Laden.”) Wynne said Flying Saucer’s various locations sold out of 3,000 of the glasses in less than 45 minutes. “I don’t think it was in poor taste or in the least offensive,” Wynne said. “Had it been, I don’t think we would have sold out as quickly as it did.” Right, that’s why The Anna Nicole Show is such a hit — because the American public has such good taste.

Perhaps next year, if the anniversary of the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa falls on a Wednesday, we’ll see even more good taste from the Saucer. Wynne said the company didn’t “in any way create fanfare around” the glass — other than featuring it in newspaper ads, of course. Pardon Static if it feels that it’s been, as country people used to say of their coffee, saucered and blowed.

Fat Profits

Seems the county’s only hospital for the poor, John Peter Smith, hasn’t done too badly pushing (Fat and) Happy Meals over at the corner of Allen and Main streets — and neither has its supplier. Hospital records show that in 2000 and 2001 — the only years for which the hospital district had readily available records — the in-hospital McDonald’s grossed $1.37 million and $1.44 million. The franchisee paid JPS $81,615 in ’00 and $88,813 in ’01 for the privilege of selling Big Macs. As the adage went in the late 1960s when clever folks smelled the profit in Lyndon Johnson’s other war: “There’s money in poverty.”

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